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Not the long walk home that will change this heart

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'Noah' screenwriter attempts to explain why everyone in his movie is white. "The race of individuals doesn't matter."

racebending:

If you’ve seen Darren Aronofsky’s Noah, you may have noticed something a little weird about the semi-Biblical, semi-apocalyptic cast of the movie: they’re all white. Even the extras.

In an interview with The Higher Calling, Noah screenwriter Ari Handel spoke about the reasoning behind the lack of racial diversity in the cast.

“From the beginning, we were concerned about casting, the issue of race. What we realized is that this story is functioning at the level of myth, and as a mythical story, the race of the individuals doesn’t matter. They’re supposed to be stand-ins for all people. Either you end up with a Bennetton ad or the crew of the Starship Enterprise. You either try to put everything in there, which just calls attention to it, or you just say, ‘Let’s make that not a factor, because we’re trying to deal with everyman.’

Looking at this story through that kind of lens is the same as saying, ‘Would the ark float and is it big enough to get all the species in there?’ That’s irrelevant to the questions because the questions are operating on a different plane than that; they’re operating on the mythical plane.”

In summary, white people are stand-ins “for all people,” and no other race could possibly qualify for “everyman” status. Ari Handel’s reasoning is that the only way to dispense with the issue of racism is to remove everyone who isn’t white. Asking what happened to all the other races is akin to nitpicking about whether the arc would float or not. It’s just silly, OK? “The race of individuals doesn’t matter,” which is why they made absolutely sure that all of those individuals were white. Or something.

Unintentionally, Handel managed to illustrate everything that’s wrong with the ongoing attitude towards casting actors of color in major Hollywood movies. White people are the norm, and everyone else is just a distraction. God forbid anyone attempt to be as diverse as the cast of the Star Trek, which debuted in 1966 and included a grand total of two non-white characters.

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Normative whiteness at work.

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projectendo:

YOU CAN TELL BY THE WAY I USE MY WALK 
I’M A WOMAN’S MAN, NO TIME TO TALK
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projectendo:

YOU CAN TELL BY THE WAY I USE MY WALK

I’M A WOMAN’S MAN, NO TIME TO TALK

(via hoppingkrazi)

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andrillian:

A quick 30 minute doodle while on work. I keep thinking about the fact that Miles gets older, more wrinkly, starting to look like his father and then they just change Phoenix’s hair and it’s done. I love it. 

And those glasses, they just do things with me.

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fairwind:

let me just talk about how rapunzel’s parents didn’t need a single line of dialogue to tell their story and i cried every time they were on screen because they were just so beautiful and expressive

(Source: adelaidese, via unseenbox)

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dizzysdomain:

shoona:

If you are having a bad night here is a drawing if a snake wearing a boot

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image

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bananawrackspurts:

are these fall out boy songs
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bananawrackspurts:

are these fall out boy songs

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The significance of plot without conflict

stilleatingoranges:

In the West, plot is commonly thought to revolve around conflict: a confrontation between two or more elements, in which one ultimately dominates the other. The standard three- and five-act plot structures—which permeate Western media—have conflict written into their…

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lineandbody:

うずまき by Junji Ito | Eyes

(via jayandsilentbobs)

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